Seminars Feb-Mar 2016

On Thurs. 11 February 2016, I’ll present “Climatic, hydrologic and geomorphic drivers of trends in flood hazards (UK/USA)” for the University of Minnesota Department of Earth Sciences 2015-2016 Seminar Series.

On Wed. 23 March 2016, I will present our new model for “Seasonal discharge forecasting in an agricultural watershed” at the Iowa Flood Center.

AGU 2015

On Fri. 18 December 2015, 13:40 – 18:00, I will present a “Diagnosis of North American Multi-Model Ensemble (NMME) skill for predicting floods and droughts over the continental USA” at the American Geophysical Union Fall meeting (session  H53A).

NMME

The poster can be downloaded from ResearchGate here

New position at the IIHR-Hydroscience & Engineering (Iowa)

On 1 July 2015 I will begin a new position as a postdoctoral research scholar in G. Villarini’s group at the Iowa Institute for Hydraulic research (IIHR – Hydroscience & Engineering, UIowa) in Iowa City. I will be working on the following research areas:

  • Streamflow/flood forecasting over relatively long lead times (monthly-seasonal), using the North-American multi-model ensemble (NMME) data
  • Assessing the skill of the NMME
  • Quantifying the agricultural/demographic drivers of flood losses

Environment Agency open-Data Advisory Group (EADAG) Blog

The Environment Agency has just launched a blog (https://eadag.wordpress.com/) for the data advisory group (EADAG). The blog is still in its infancy, but will most likely be used to host:

  • Regular information regarding recently released and upcoming datasets
  • A starting point for “finding and using EA data”
  • Information provided by EA to support the group, including the datasets list, revenue and income (if and when these are available)
  • EA open data presentations
  • Contact details for the group

I help maintain the blog, so do get in touch if you have any suggestions.

New paper: Hydrologic versus geomorphic drivers of flood hazard

Slater maps

Our paper titled Hydrologic versus geomorphic drivers of flood hazard – which separates and quantifies the effects of trends in streamflow and trends in channel capacity on flood hazards – has just been published in Geophysical Research Letters. The detailed methods can be found in the supplementary materials.  An article was recently released on this work on the Flooding and Coastal Erosion Risk management network (FCERM.net).

Inaugural meeting of the Environment Agency’s open-access Data Advisory Group (EADAG)

On Tuesday 18th November, I attended the inaugural meeting of the EA’s Data Advisory Group. Surprisingly, many members of the group (including myself) were interested in hydrometric data for flood hazard assessment. The EA explained that they are committed to publishing as much of their data as possible, and making it open access to the public under the Open Government Licence (OGL). So far, 101 of their 17,000 datasets have been published. The difficulty is prioritising what data should be released first, given the difficulties associated with preparing the data for release. Comments and suggestions for the EADAG can be shared via the EA’s website, twitter feed (@dataenvagency), or email (opendata@environment-agency.gov.uk).

Early Career Researcher Grant

Delighted to have received a British Society for Geomorphology Early Career Grant for a project entitled ‘To what extent have changes in river channel capacity contributed to flood hazard trends in England and Wales?’

Outline: Freshwater flood damages have increased dramatically over recent decades, and are of concern to millions of people living in flood-prone areas across the world. Most studies assume that trends in flood hazard are caused exclusively by changes in hydrology and climate. However, widespread anthropogenic influences to river systems have caused changes in the capacity of river channels, which can also modify flood hazard.

The aim of this project is to investigate how geomorphic changes in channel capacity have contributed to changing flood hazards, in comparison with hydro-climatic trends in the frequency of flood flows, in England and Wales. The grant will allow me to supplement data provided by the Environment Agency and Natural Resources Wales with field trips to obtain quantitative and qualitative channel characteristics to understand the causes of geomorphic change at each site; and to disseminate my work at the AGU Fall meeting in San Francisco, later this year.

Research Seminar on the Compared Effects of Hydrology and Geomorphology on Flood Hazard

I will be presenting some of my recent work at the upcoming research seminar in London: Compared Effects of Hydrologic and Geomorphic Trends on Flood Hazard Across the USA

Workers build flood defences around a resident’s house in the flooded village of Moorland near Bridgwater on the Somerset Levels on February 10, 2014 in Somerset, England. Source: Matt Cardy/ Getty Images
Workers build flood defences around a resident’s house in the flooded village of Moorland near Bridgwater on the Somerset Levels on February 10, 2014 in Somerset, England. Source: Matt Cardy/ Getty Images

Date: Tuesday 14 October 2014
Time: 12:15 – 1:15pm
Venue: Francis Bancroft building 2.07 City Centre seminar room
Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road London E1 4NS
Members of the public are welcome to all of our seminars at QMUL, and people with an interest in flood hazard, hydrology, geomorphology, and/or stream gauging are particularly welcome.