EGU 2020

A brief overview of our talks and sessions at EGU 2020:

  • Session: Hydrological extremes: from droughts to floods (HS2.4.1)
    Convener: Louise Slater
    Co-conveners: Anne Van Loon, Gregor Laaha, Ilaria Prodoscimi, Lena M. Tallaksen
    Orals: Thu, 07 May, 08:30-12:30, room C
    Posters: Thu, 07 May, 14:00-15:45 
  • Session: Using R in Hydrology (SC1.12)
    Convener: Katie Smith
    Co-conveners: Lucy Barker, Ilaria Prosdocimi, Louise Slater, Guillaume Thirel
    Wed, 06 May, 08:30-10:15, room -2.16
  • Talk: Timo Kelder, M. Müller, L. Slater, R. Wilby, P. Bohlinger, T. Marjoribanks, C. Prudhomme, A. Dyrdall, T. Nipen, L. Ferranti.
    UNSEEN trends: Towards detection of changes in 100-year precipitation events over the last 35 years.
    Thurs, 07 May, 08:45, Room 0.14
  • Poster: Marcus Buechel, S. Dadson, L.Slater.
    Achieving Net Zero: Understanding the Potential Hydrological Impacts of Changing Climate and Land Cover in the UK
    Fri, 08 May, 14:00-15:45, poster Hall A, board A112
  • Poster: Matthew Farnham et al.
    Correlated surface water flood damages in three Indonesian cities 
    Thurs 07 May, poster Hall X4, board X4.84, 16:15-18:00.

Seminars Feb-Mar 2016

On Thurs. 11 February 2016, I’ll present “Climatic, hydrologic and geomorphic drivers of trends in flood hazards (UK/USA)” for the University of Minnesota Department of Earth Sciences 2015-2016 Seminar Series.

On Wed. 23 March 2016, I will present our new model for “Seasonal discharge forecasting in an agricultural watershed” at the Iowa Flood Center.

Early Career Researcher Grant

Delighted to have received a British Society for Geomorphology Early Career Grant for a project entitled ‘To what extent have changes in river channel capacity contributed to flood hazard trends in England and Wales?’

Outline: Freshwater flood damages have increased dramatically over recent decades, and are of concern to millions of people living in flood-prone areas across the world. Most studies assume that trends in flood hazard are caused exclusively by changes in hydrology and climate. However, widespread anthropogenic influences to river systems have caused changes in the capacity of river channels, which can also modify flood hazard.

The aim of this project is to investigate how geomorphic changes in channel capacity have contributed to changing flood hazards, in comparison with hydro-climatic trends in the frequency of flood flows, in England and Wales. The grant will allow me to supplement data provided by the Environment Agency and Natural Resources Wales with field trips to obtain quantitative and qualitative channel characteristics to understand the causes of geomorphic change at each site; and to disseminate my work at the AGU Fall meeting in San Francisco, later this year.